Genre: glbtq

Book Review: Into the Drowning Deep

Posted January 24, 2018 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 2 Comments
Book Review: Into the Drowning Deep

Into the Drowning Deep made it onto my reading list because it just seemed like the perfect gritty mermaid story – one that so many of us have waited to hit the shelves. Sure, I love the beautiful myths and sugary scenes of lovely underwater scenery of flaxen haired women. I even love the darker imagery of smirking, half naked gals who flirt with pirates and bask in their own lovely forms. But mermaid lovers know that there is also another side to the story that is just waiting to come to light. not this book Mira Grant is here more »

Book Review: Our Own Private Universe

Posted February 22, 2017 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 1 Comment
Book Review: Our Own Private Universe

Talley hit my radar with her amazing novel Lies We Tell Ourselves back in 2014. Since her debut novel, I’ve kept an eye out for her books, which seem to focus on diversity and pro-GLBTA characters and social inclusion plots. In her 4th novel, Talley explores the life of a black teenage girl examining her own sexuality while testing the bounds of her own world, fitting into all of the spaces of her life. Talley pushes below the surface to dive further into other social issues, reflecting back to her first novel set up. What I Enjoyed Tackling and discussing stereotypes in the novel more »

Forgotten Fridays: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Posted February 12, 2016 by Maryam in book review, forgotten fridays, Kara, Lyn, Maryam / 1 Comment
Forgotten Fridays: Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

  Last month Maryam chose to read Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, together with Kara and Lyn! However, Maryam didn’t manage to finish in time, so there’ll be TWO FF this month! (Also, please remember that discussions sometimes lead to spoilers. While we try very hard to stay away from them, it still happens from time to time. If you haven’t read this book, be aware of potential spoilers during the discussion posts. You can’t say we didn’t warn you!) Lyn: So, Maryam, what made you pick this choice for us this month? Maryam: It seemed more »

Book Review: What We Left Behind

Posted November 5, 2015 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 2 Comments
Book Review: What We Left Behind

After reading her debut novel Lies We Tell Ourselves, Talley made my list of autobuy authors. This new author came across as someone whom kept her integrity intact while telling her story, not matter the intensity of the situation. One of my favorite book memories came from meeting her at BEA in 2014. She stated that while she was writing Lies We Tell Ourselves, she confessed that at times, her hands were shaking because of the severity of the context of the novel. I was completely inspired by her words and her quote.  How great was this to discover that there more »

Book Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Posted September 25, 2015 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 2 Comments
Book Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post

This book kept cropping up during quite a few diversity topics among the blogs recently. I was finally pushed into buying it when one of my own co-bloggers recommended it. I’m happy that I snagged this one up. I wasn’t very sure on what to expect, which made me happy. I knew that there was a “pray the gay away” plot, but overall, I wanted to get the first hand experience of Cameron and her horrible education. I certainly hope that the three star rating doesn’t throw off anyone – this was a wonderful and quite frank depiction of the hurdles more »

Book Review: Lucky Linus

Posted August 5, 2015 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 0 Comments
Book Review: Lucky Linus

Lucky Linus was a just a perfect morsel of my appetite for gay teen fiction, since Simon had kicked off my rabid fangirling. Also, the model on the front is so adorable! I loved that the description included a gay teen in foster care. The subject matter included quite a bit of diversity and was wonderful way to include a specific, yet highly discriminated, group of older kids.  Lucky Linus was a lot shorter than I was expecting, which is sad, because this story had a lot of give, and a subject this big and this controversial was too contained in a short more »