Author: Daisy Whitney

Book Review: The Mockingbirds

Posted August 14, 2015 by Lyn Kaye in book review, Lyn / 4 Comments
Book Review: The Mockingbirds

TRIGGER WARNING: The following review centers around a rape victim and discusses attitudes towards rape and victim blaming. With the current climate towards sexual assault on college campuses, it is imperative that we include these events in today’s media, advocating for the victims of rape and sexual assault. We’ve made some progress in the area, but it still isn’t enough. For example, Cracked ran an article about interviewing a college rapist, who admitted to raping a girl, and was afraid to speak out because he knew that the victim would still shoulder the blame, even though he was admitting to more »

Book Review: The Fire Artist

Posted October 5, 2014 by Kara in book review, Kara / 0 Comments
Book Review: The Fire Artist

I had low expectations going into The Fire Artist for two reasons. One, the cover is terrible. They redesigned it and it is STILL terrible. Two, the plot doesn’t sound all that original. After reading it, it actually kind of is, but I still had a good number of issues with this book, and it ultimately left me really underwhelmed which is a monster shame because I really loved When You Were Here. I get the impression from a lot of readers that this author’s work is kind of hit or miss, and I can totally see that because this book felt as if more »

Book Review of When You Were Here by Daisy Whitney

Posted June 13, 2013 by Kara in book review, Kara / 22 Comments
Book Review of When You Were Here by Daisy Whitney

I read this book on the plane to New York City for BEA, and I finished it on day two while I was trapped in the hotel room with messed up feet. So…this book will always hold a special place in my heart no matter what. I read it at a time in my life when I was experiencing new things and widening my horizons and comfort zone. It’s hard to be subjective about books like that and look at what’s there and see the flaws. But there are some. Fortunately, they are not many, and for the most part more »